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20130206
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energy policy. >> i have the book. you have all been waiting for it and take you for giving me the opportunity to talk a little bit about what we have been doing on the energy committee for the past year in an effort to really focus on where we have been with energy policy and really helping to move forward in a way that is not the same old same old, but really real imagining and refocusing where we should be has been an important opportunity for us to really put some considered thought into the proposal. what you have in front of you is better than airplane reading. there are some suggestions in this energy 2020 document that people will look at and they will argue and they will say -- that is one person's view. that is true, that is true. but while we are trying to do is not give you a legislative package starting with initiatives that we are going to kind of clicked off as we move forward. this is really designed to be a discussion blueprint. we want to try to change the conversation. one of the reasons we have to think about changing the conversation is because the energy p
diplomacy and the energy of our people remain unrivaled. as the world has changed, so have the levers that can change in shape international affairs. truman and acheson were building the parthenon with clear lines. the pillars or a handful of big institutions dominated by major powers. that structure delivered unprecedented peace and prosperity. but time takes its toll even on the greatest atedifice. we need a new architect for this world. more frank gehry than formal greek. think of it. of this work might appear have hazard. it is sophisticated -- some of his work might appear haphazard. we need a dynamic mix of materials and structures. as we saw from the intervention to stop a massacre in libya, there will always be times when it is necessary to use force. america is the ability to project power over the globe remains essential. i'm proud of the partnerships the state department has formed with the pentagon. america's traditional allies and friends in europe and east asia remain in valuable partners in nearly everything we do. we've spent energy strengthening those bonds over the p
's largest consumer of energy. we talked about that briefly. it is clear the military will benefit from cheaper, more stable fuel costs over the long term and promising work is being done in the area to commercialize alternative fuels that can be produced abundantly in the united states. this is very important for all of our -- hawaii. if confirmed, will you continue to emphasize and prioritize research, development and where possible deployment of renewable fuels, as well as enhanced energy efficiency efforts to reduce the department of defense's energy costs over the long term? >> senator, as you noted, the department of defense is the largest user of certainly liquid fuels, but i think our energy budget -- i do not know the exact number, but it is probably around $18 billion a year. anything we can do to make any aspect of securing our country more cost-effective, we need to look at. i would make that a high priority if i am confirmed and go to the defense department -- to see how we do that, how we continue to do that he cousin in the end, for all the reasons you know, -- because in
on energy production -- coal, natural gas, uranium, and even wind, making it a boom and bust economy. many working in the agent -- in the area make significant salaries when they work, but this can skew the average income for families. although some do well financially, there are a number of people struggling to make ends meet. this income disparity can be a challenge to meeting designation guidelines. thank you for your time and attention to this very important matter. i look forward to any questions you may have. our fourth witness is the acting chief at the boise medical wrote center. dr. wilbert is the associate program director for the internal medicine program and the va center of excellence in primary care education. thanks very much for being with us. >> thank you, chairman sanders and members of the committee. it is a great honor to be able to testify here today. i was asked by senator sanders about my insight. specifically, and insight about the lack of health insurance in the u.s., and its affect on outcomes, and to share my thinking is on the physician and workforce shortage th
this morning. >> on tomorrow morning, a look at the u.s. auto industry. we'll discuss our environmental energy affects the auto industry. and talk about auto safety and federal regulation. our guest is matt blunt, head of the auto -- automotive policy council. to promote the role of the auto industry in the my. we're live on washington journey every day on 7:00 eastern. >> one can't count the times that americans say we're the best country in the world. what a stupid thing to say. everyone thinks the country is pretty good. why do we have to believe that we are the best? what does that mean? why do we have to assert it? all of the time? what does it mean to other people? american products go around the world, information products go around the world, in every corner of the world. we teach them not to like us. >> author and activist and transafrica founder, randall robinson. in depth, three hours live on "book tv" on c-span2. >> the senate yesterday confirmed john kerry to the secretary of state. governor deval patrick named his replacement for senator kerry. he named william cowan to the senat
congress, it was already approved in the house energy and commerce committee and included in a broader children's health bill but has failed to be considered in the senate. i urge my colleagues to support this bipartisan effort to address pediatric research and with that strong support it's my hope we can encourage its passage in the senate this time. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the chair recognizes the gentleman from pennsylvania. pitespites i yield such time to the chairman of the full committee, mr. up ton, the gentleman from michigan. mr. upton: this legislation, h.r. 225, the national pediatric research network act of 2013 indeed brings us a step closer to helping kids with unmet health needs, especially those with rare pediatric and genetic diseases. according to the n.i.h. there are more than 6,800 rare diseases and most of them have no treatment or cure and yes, they primarily affect children. i met a number of times with one family in my district, the kennedys who have two precious little girls and
couple days is the notion of the energy and excitement we've seen around the issue as it continues to grow, keeps going at new innovations, new partners. the people coming to fight this ancient crime. less and less of it the last few years to find myself walking into a room and having to explain what trafficking in persons face. a much unlikely to be someplace of people is that i did my dissertation i'm not going steady net. or if there were certain age, make some you need to work on this. or if i'm an academic setting, how to get professors to buffer a trafficking course? i will say what we think trafficking is before this talk is over. it's always good to go back to principles and different definitions out on the table. no longer is it that strange moment when people say you work on slavery, what do you mean you work on human trafficking? the justice department's civil rights had a business card with my title before we called this human trafficking which those of you who've been around a few years back remembered only dates back to 2001. is the involuntary servitude toward nader
. millions of people either lost their jobs or saw their wages fall. food and energy prices went up for many middle and low-income people. everyday costs like rent, utility and food became more difficult and in many cases families were forced to choose between food and electricity. even before the recession started, tens of millions of americans went hungry at some point during the year. that, too, is unconscionable. when we turn this economy around, and it will rebound, we need to end hunger now. we may not be able to wipe out all disease, we probably can't eliminate war, but we have the resources, we know what it takes. we need to muster the will to end hunger once and for all. hunger is a political condition. it's important to point out that even though 50 million people were food insecure, the vast majority had a safety net that prevented them from actually starving. that safety ned is called the supplement -- that safety net is called snap. snap is a program that provides low-income families with food they otherwise could not afford to buy. more than 75 million families relied on snap t
to environmental programs, $400 million cuts to home energy assistance. $29 million in cuts to the community-oriented policing service, the cops program. and i talked to municipalities in my district they talk about the layoffs that have already occurred. this means jobs were lost and weren't created and services were cut to families and smart investments weren't made. but the republicans are insisting on additional deficit reductions from even more severe cuts including social security, medicare and medicaid benefits. and just to point out, the poorest class of adults in the united states of america are people over 65 years of age with median incomes of $20,000 a year. don't be bullied and go after them. what my colleagues and i are offering today is a smarter alternative that would close tax loopholes for the wealthiest individuals and corporations and cut through military waste and create one million new jobs by investing in infrastructure and keeping teachers in the classroom. what the balancing act does is offer long-term deficit reduction in a fair and balanced way. balanced means in a
texas, he's wrong. he's on the energy and commerce committee. the affordable care act had hearings in the energy and commerce and in markups. there was multiple hearings on that bill. i don't know what he is talking about. the gentleman from georgia said that the bill that he's toting here mentions it in his very political-inspired findings. read your own bill. three pages long. i know it may be too much. we're all told to read the bill. rather than being here telling the president what to do, he's going to submit a budget. we have to do our job and our job is to avoid the sequestration. because if we don't there are millions of people in this country who will be without work, there will be programs that will be arbitrarily cut, this economy will be hurt. if you want sequestration then you continue to take your recesses and do this kind of trivial stuff on the house floor, but we ought to be finding a way to avoid going offer the sequestration cliff. at this point, mr. speaker, i'd like to yield two minutes to the gentlewoman from texas, ms. jackson lee. the speaker pro tempore: th
living in a county that is almost 10,500 miles of land mass. wyoming's economy is based on energy production, coal, natural gas, oil, uranium, and wind. the people working in the energy industry make a sufficient salary, but in some cases, it can skew the average income for families based on statewide data. some families do well financially. there are still a number of people struggling to make ends meet. this can be another challenge to meeting designating guidelines. thank you for your time and attention to this important matter. >> thank you for being with us. thank you for your testimony. i went forth witnesse is dr. andrew wilper. he is a practicing general internist. he is the associate program director at the boise internal director program. thank you for being with us. >> thank you. it is a great honor to testify here today. i was asked by senator sanders about my insight. one about the lack of health insurance in the united states and it affects on health and healthcare outcomes and to share my thinking on solutions to to the primary care workforce shortage. there is an e
that the energies, the loss to have introduced does not include this. this is prior to the law. senator feinstein suggested if they could get registered, they could have forced buybacks. in modern times, there are two other reasons why you do not want a federal registry. the results have been not good. there was a time when all of the best motives on the part of the government. they could take a list and lock it in the vault and be secure. we cannot even secure national defense secrets now. the arts are that if we kept that registry -- and it is illegal now. if you go to the system, they can check you but they cannot keep the record. it is checked and then there is no cost to canada had a big registry but they just stopped it because it did not do anything. in the 60's and the 80's, people had to keep track of ammunition sales. finally the government said this makes no sense because ammunition is a commodity and that does not do any good. it takes tons and tons of paperwork to look at it. the question is what works and what doesn't work. >> you mentioned that there are plenty of democrats who wer
all of us enriched by the spirit and energy and diligence that he put into that work. we are all admonished by his the marcher. -- by his departure. good journalism is the essence, it is at the heart of an open society. as long as we have good journalists we will continue to have a free and open society. thank you all so much for joining us. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [indiscernible] >> in just about half an hour we will take you live to las vegas. president obama will be speaking about immigration. we understand that could get away -- that could get under way a bit early. we will follow that with your comments on the issue of immigration. up until then we are going to bring you yesterday's news conference with democrats and republicans, unveiling their bipartisan immigration proposal. >> first we want to thank everybody for joining us. we are here to announce that the five of us here today, and eight of us in total, have come together on a set of bipartisan principles for comprehensi
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13